Database of Research on Ageing

73 results found

Future research on dementia relating to culturally and linguistically diverse communities

Author/s: Low, Lee-Fay Draper, Brian Cheng, Ada Cruysmans, Benedict Hayward-Wright, Nicky Jeon, Yun-Hee LoGiudice, Dina Wu, Helen Zong Ying Zogalis, Georgia Brodaty, Henry | Year: 2009 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia, Researching CALD

Reference:

Key Words:
Research aim:
Describes challenges to conducting CALD dementia research; these include sampling, having valid instruments and costs.
Results/Conclusion:
Nine key research recommendations in the areas of epidemiology, community knowledge, carers, service delivery, screening and assessment, medical management, residential aged care and minority CALD reached by consensus by an expert group are presented
Implications:
strategies to encourage CALD research
Cultural Group(s):
CALD
Location of study:
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
Research approach:
Literature review and expert meetings
Type of data:
Secondary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:
A review of 551 Australian articles on dementia published in journals and books between 2005 and 2007 found only four articles specifically related to persons from CALD backgrounds - therefore they assigned 8 experts to do a literature review in their field. Other reports and publications came out of this including Cheng et al. - Strategic Directions in CALD research in Australia

Moving towards culturally competent dementia care: have we been barking up the wrong tree?

Author/s: Mackenzie, J. Bartlett, R. Downs, M. | Year: 2005 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia

Reference: Mackenzie, J., R. Bartlett and M. Downs (2005) "Moving towards culturally competent dementia care: have we been barking up the wrong tree?" Reviews in Clinical Gerontology 15(01):39-46

Key Words:
Dementia, CALD, Health and Social Services
Research aim:
In an attempt to make a preliminary contribution towards a debate on solution-focused culturally appropriate care, this paper draws from empirical studies and recent conceptual developments on different views of dementia, and discusses their possible impact on service use and the expectations of users.
Results/Conclusion:
The need for an approach that complements cultural influences on health beliefs is essential, in order to work towards providing flexible services able to meet the need of diverse populations. In this paper we have explored four possible explanatory models for understanding dementia. Currently, culturally appropriate service provision for older people in the UK is patchy, and a systematic evaluation of the success, or otherwise, of locally generated initiatives is overdue. However the differing explanations for dementia considered in this paper, along with their likely impact on helpseeking behaviour, provide an alternative starting point for considering how culturally appropriate dementia care might be achieved.
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
CALD
Location of study:
United Kingdom
Age group:
Not specific
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
Research approach:
Type of data:
Literature review
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Using spiritual reminiscence with a small group of Latvian residents with dementia in a nursing home: A multifaith and multicultural perspective

Author/s: MacKinlay, Elizabeth | Year: 2009 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia, Residential Care

Reference:

Key Words:
dementia, spirituality
Research aim:
This article examines spirituality and meaning in the experience of dementia of older Latvian residents
Results/Conclusion:
Main themes identified were need for connectedness; spiritual and religious practices; vulnerability and transcendence; physical health issues; wisdom and memory; war experiences; hope/fear; and communication style of facilitator.
Implications:
Found other people in the group provided the most support (more than an outsider could have done) because of the understood and shared experience
Cultural Group(s):
Latvian
Location of study:
Age group:
Number included in study:
3 people participated - forms part of a larger study of 113 individuals with dementia
Type of participants:
residents of a residential care facility who were involved in a larger study of 113 people with dementia
Research approach:
Qualitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Data were analyzed using grounded theory and NVIVO7 computer package for qualitative data analysis.
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

A systematic review of ethnicity and pathways to care in dementia

Author/s: Mukadam, N. Cooper, C. Livingston, G. | Year: 2011 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia

Reference: Mukadam, N., C. Cooper and G. Livingston (2011) "A systematic review of ethnicity and pathways to care in dementia" International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 26(1):12-20

Key Words:
Dementia, CALD, Health Services, Systematic Review
Research aim:
A systematic review to explore why people from minority ethnic (ME) groups with dementia present later to specialist diagnostic and therapeutic dementia services.
Results/Conclusion:
Barriers to accessing specialist help for dementia included: not conceptualising dementia as an illness; believing dementia was a normal consequence of ageing; thinking dementia had spiritual, psychological, physical health or social causes; feeling that caring for the person with dementia was a personal or family responsibility; experiences of shame and stigma within the community; believing there was nothing that could be done to help; and negative experiences of healthcare services. Recognition of dementia as an illness and knowledge about dementia facilitated accessing help. Conclusions: There are significant barriers to help seeking for dementia in ME groups. These may explain why people from ME groups often presented to therapeutic and diagnostic services at a late stage in their illness.
Implications:
Further study is needed to elucidate the role that ethnicity and culture play in the help-seeking pathway for dementia, and to design and test interventions to improve equity of access to healthcare services.
Cultural Group(s):
CALD
Location of study:
United Kingdom
Age group:
Number included in study:
13 studies were included in the review
Type of participants:
Peer reviewed journal articles
Research approach:
Type of data:
Literature review
Secondary data sources used:
Peer reviewed journal articles
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Dementia Caregiving: The Experiences of Hispanic/Latino Caregivers

Author/s: Neary, Susan R. Mahoney, Diane Feeney | Year: 2005 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia

Reference:

Key Words:
dementia, informal care, caregiving, cultural influences
Research aim:
The purpose of this study was to explore the phenomenon of dementia caregiving in an ethnically diverse group of Latino caregivers, with the goal of identifying cultural influences on the caregiving experience.
Results/Conclusion:
A lack of knowledge about dementia, rather than culturally influenced beliefs, was the major deterrent to recognition of initial symptoms. Participants viewed family-centered home care as a culturally embedded value but were willing to consider placement when home care became impractical.
Implications:
Providers need to understand the ways in which caregivers must negotiate the tension between cultural beliefs and the demands of their individual circumstances.
Cultural Group(s):
Latino Americans
Location of study:
United States
Age group:
mean age 50 (caregivers)
Number included in study:
11
Type of participants:
family caregivers of Latino people with dementia
Research approach:
Qualitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Out of the Shadows: The Development of a Best Practice Model of Care for People Living with Dementia

Author/s: Nunn, Russell While, Christine Sims, Nia | Year: 2009 | Publication type: Report | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia

Reference:

Key Words:
Research aim:
To develop a best practice Model of Care designed to support the needs of district nursing clients with dementia, their families and carers incorporating screening, assessment, management and referral processes and to implement and conduct an evaluation of the dementia Model of Care
Results/Conclusion:
A substantial list of barriers to the provision of effective care to clients with a cognitive impairment was identified in Phase 1 of the project. Overall, the findings of Phase 2 demonstrate that a large number of these barriers have been addressed via the implementation of the Model of Care.
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
Location of study:
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
Research approach:
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:
Almost one fifth (19.5%) of clients with a diagnosis of dementia had a primary language other than English

A comparison of verbal communication and psychiatric medication use by Greek and Italian residents with dementia in Australian ethno-specific and mainstream aged care facilities

Author/s: Runci, S. J. Eppingstall, B. J. O'Connor, D. W. | Year: 2012 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Culturally Appropriate Care, Dementia, Language and Translation

Reference:

Key Words:
dementia, social interaction, language proficiency, residential care facilities
Research aim:
This project compared verbal communication and prescribed psychiatric medication of Greek and Italian residents with dementia in ethno-specific and mainstream residential care.
Results/Conclusion:
The observed rate of resident-to-resident communication was higher in the ethno-specific facilities. Staff-to-resident interaction rate did not differ between the facility types. Residents in ethno-specific care were prescribed antipsychotics at a significantly lower rate.
Implications:
Residents with dementia and limited English language proficiency in mainstream care would benefit from greater opportunities to interact with peers in their own language. Prescribed medication should be monitored to ensure that these residents are not misinterpreted as "disruptive," or are not actually more agitated due to difficulty in communicating their needs.
Cultural Group(s):
Greek, Italian
Location of study:
Residential care facilities
Age group:
Number included in study:
82
Type of participants:
older Greek and Italians diagnosed with dementia in ethno specific and mainstream care
Research approach:
Observation, qualitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:
cross referenced in dementia workbook

Support Group for Latino Caregivers of Dementia Elders: Cultural Humility and Cultural Competence

Author/s: Reynoso-Vallejo, Humberto | Year: 2009 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Carers who are CALD, Dementia

Reference:

Key Words:
International study, CALD carers, dementia, radio, Latino, support groups
Research aim:
This study reports on an intervention for Latino caregivers of elders with Alzheimer's disease through the development of a support group on the radio.
Results/Conclusion:
This model of intervention, the radio support group, showed that innovation simultaneously with cultural humility approaches is promising. Overall, caregivers found this information useful, suggesting the need for more cultural humility type of interventions. Cultural humility approaches and a set of culturally relevant services are needed for Latino caregivers and family members to address their needs and help overcome some of the challenges that individuals and families affected by Alzheimer's disease experience.
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
Latino
Location of study:
United States (Boston)
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
participants in a longitudinal study and participants in an intervention group
Research approach:
Mixed methods
Type of data:
Mixed
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

The Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale (RUDAS) and the Folstein MMSE in a multicultural cohort of elderly persons

Author/s: Rowland,Jeffrey T. Basic,David Storey,Joella E. Conforti,David A. | Year: 2006 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia

Reference:

Key Words:
Research aim:
To compare the accuracy of the Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale (RUDAS) and the Folstein Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE) for diagnosis of dementia in a multicultural cohort of elderly persons.
Results/Conclusion:
The MMSE, but not the RUDAS, scores were influenced by preferred language (p = 0.015), total years of education (p = 0.016) and gender (p = 0.044).
Implications:
The RUDAS is at least as accurate as the MMSE, and does not appear to be influenced by language, education or gender. The high positive likelihood ratio for the RUDAS makes it particularly useful for ruling-in disease.
Cultural Group(s):
Location of study:
Age group:
Number included in study:
129
Type of participants:
community dwelling older people who had been referred to an aged care team
Research approach:
Quantitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
RUDAS, MMSE
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Ethno-specific homes help dementia patients

Author/s: Runci, S | Year: 2004 | Publication type: Research report | Peer reviewed: No | Topic area/s: Dementia, Residential Care

Reference: Runci, S. (2004) "Ethno-specific homes help dementia patients" Australian Nursing Journal, Vol 12:33

Key Words:
Dementia, Nursing Homes, CALD, Language
Research aim:
To create a profile of nursing home residents in south-east Melbourne who either preferred or needed to speak a language other than English.
Results/Conclusion:
Elderly patients with dementia from non-English speaking backgrounds communicate more with others and take fewer psychiatric medications when living in ethno-specific nursing homes.
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
CALD
Location of study:
Victoria (Melbourne)
Age group:
Not specific - nursing home residents
Number included in study:
1,100 nursing home residents profiled, then observations of 39 residents
Type of participants:
Nursing home residents
Research approach:
Mixed methods
Type of data:
Mixed
Secondary data sources used:
Nursing Home records
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes: