Database of Research on Ageing

73 results found

Racial, Ethnic, and Cultural Differences in the Dementia Caregiving Experience: Recent Findings

Author/s: Janevic, M. and Connell, C. | Year: 2001 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia, Carers of CALD Older People

Reference: Janevic, M. and C. Connell (2001) "Racial, Ethnic, and Cultural Differences in the Dementia Caregiving Experience: Recent Findings" The Gerontologist 41(3):334-347

Key Words:
Dementia, Alzheimer's disease, CALD, caregivers
Research aim:
This research reviewed studies that compare two or more racial, ethnic, national, or cultural groups on aspects of the dementia caregiving experience.
Results/Conclusion:
Consistent with previous research, White caregivers were more likely to be spouses when compared to other groups. White caregivers tended to report greater depression and appraised caregiving as more stressful than African American caregivers. Findings were mixed regarding differences in coping and social support, but suggested that minority groups may not have more available support than Whites. Common methodological limitations were a lack of noncaregiving control groups and failure to test specific pathways by which the grouping variable (e.g., race) exerts its impact on outcome variables.
Implications:
Future studies in this area should use both quantitative and qualitative research methods to specify the pathways by which race, ethnicity, and culture affect the caregiving experience, and should expand their focus beyond the primary caregiver to include the effects of caregiving on families and networks.
Cultural Group(s):
CALD
Location of study:
United States
Age group:
Number included in study:
21 studies were included in the review
Type of participants:
Peer reviewed journal articles
Research approach:
Quantitative
Type of data:
Literature review
Secondary data sources used:
Peer reviewed journal articles
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Caring for older people with dementia: An exploratory study of staff knowledge and perception of training in three Australian dementia care facilities

Author/s: Jones, C. Moyle, W. Stockwell-Smith, G. | Year: 2013 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia

Reference: Jones, C., W. Moyle and G. Stockwell-Smith (2013) "Caring for older people with dementia: An exploratory study of staff knowledge and perception of training in three Australian dementia care facilities." Australasian Journal on Ageing 32(1): 52-55.

Key Words:
dementia care, staff training, CALD carers
Research aim:
To ascertain care staff's knowledge of dementia relating to aetiology and/or pathology, symptoms and care/treatment; and explore their perceptions of the importance and adequacy of dementia education and training opportunities.
Results/Conclusion:
Knowledge discrepancy was attributed to participants' cultural and ethnic origin and the length of residency in Australia of migrant care staff.
Implications:
There is a need to improve care staff knowledge of dementia, and dementia education and training should include direct practical competencies required for effective care delivery.
Cultural Group(s):
CALD dementia care staff, non-CALD dementia care staff
Location of study:
Multiple locations
Age group:
Carers in the business of providing care for older peopld with dementia
Number included in study:
35
Type of participants:
staff memebers across 3 dementia care facilities
Research approach:
Mixed methods
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Kalimera – host home respite for Greek people with dementia

Author/s: Leake, S Michael, P Kyrkou, A | Year: 2005 | Publication type: Conference presentation | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Culturally Appropriate Care, Dementia, Carers who are CALD

Reference:

Key Words:
Greek, respite, ethno-specific care, CALD carers
Research aim:
Discussion about the development of Australia's first ethno-specific host home respite program.
Results/Conclusion:
Discussion of the merits of this program for older Greek community members, response from carers and participants.
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
Greek (case study)
Location of study:
Victoria (Melbourne)
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
Research approach:
Type of data:
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:
Not primary research, conference paper about home host respite program for older Greek people with dementia

Factors impacting on early detection of dementia in older people of Asian background in primary healthcare

Author/s: Lee, Sook Meng Lin, Xiaoping Haralambous, Betty Dow, Briony Vrantsidis, Freda Tinney, Jean Blackberry, Irene Lautenschlager, Nicola Giudice, Dina Lo | Year: 2011 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia

Reference:

Key Words:
Research aim:
This paper aims to present a literature review on factors impacting on the early diagnosis of dementia in primary care. Cultural factors pertaining to older people of Chinese and Vietnamese backgrounds are identified and described.
Results/Conclusion:
The review found that despite the benefits and emphasis on early diagnosis of dementia, GPs′ uncertainty, insufficient training, ambivalent attitude and therapeutic nihilism have contributed to delayed diagnosis of dementia in CALD populations in primary care. Other factors included time pressures, poor remuneration and lack of CALD appropriate diagnostic tools and services. From the older Chinese and Vietnamese people and their families′ perspective, living arrangements, level of dementia literacy, symptom interpretation, stigma associated with dementia and their concept of morality significantly impacted on health-seeking behaviour, contributing to delayed presentation to GPs. Language barriers and lack of bilingual GPs were also found to be deterring factors.
Implications:
There is a need to remove barriers impacting on the timely diagnosis of dementia in primary healthcare for older people from CALD backgrounds. Increasing CALD-appropriate services, workforce training, public awareness and removing stigma may assist.
Cultural Group(s):
Chinese, Vietnamese
Location of study:
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
Research approach:
Type of data:
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:
Varying expressions of dementia literacy within the Chinese and Vietnames groups sometimes result in presentation to health services at a later stage of the disease.

A Pilot of an Intervention Delivered to Chinese- and Spanish-Speaking Carers of People With Dementia in Australia

Author/s: Leone, Desiree Carragher, Natacha Santalucia, Yvonne Draper, Brian Thompson, Larry W. Shanley, Christopher Mollina, Angelica Chen, Langduo Kyriazopoulos, Helena Thompson, Dolores Gallagher | Year: 2013 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia

Reference:

Key Words:
Research aim:
To explore language and culture-specific support programs for carers of people with dementia - the group intervention for use with Chinese and Spanish speakers in the United States was adapted to the Australian context, and a pilot study was undertaken with these 2 communities.
Results/Conclusion:
A significant decrease in depression, anxiety, and stress was observed among Spanish speakers; a significant decrease in depression and anxiety was present among the Chinese speakers.
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
Location of study:
Age group:
Number included in study:
22
Type of participants:
Chinese and Spanish-speaking carers of people with dementia
Research approach:
Type of data:
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale—Short form (DASS-21)
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Reexamining the Relationships Among Dementia, Stigma, and Aging in Immigrant Chinese and Vietnamese Family Caregivers

Author/s: Liu, Dandan Hinton, Ladson Tran, Cindy Hinton, Devon Barker, Judith | Year: 2008 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia, Carers of Older CALD People

Reference:

Key Words:
Chinese, Vietnamese, stigma, family carers, stigma, mental health
Research aim:
This study examines the relationship of stigma and dementia among Chinese and Vietnamese family caregivers
Results/Conclusion:
Stigma was a common theme in the interviews (91%). Further analysis revealed two sources: the stigma of chronic and severe mental illness and a stigma reflecting negative stereotypes of aging or the aged. Chinese and Vietnamese cultural views of normal aging are not unitary but accommodate different trajectories of aging, some more and some less desired. When applied to persons with dementia, a "normalized" but negative trajectory of aging carried with it significant stigma that was distinct from but in addition to the stigma of chronic and severe mental illness.
Implications:
Older Chinese and Vietnamese with dementia are thus at risk of experiencing multiple stigmas that include but go beyond the stigma associated with chronic and severe mental illness.
Cultural Group(s):
Chinese, Vietnamese
Location of study:
United States
Age group:
Care givers of Chinese and Vietnamese aged 55+
Number included in study:
32
Type of participants:
Chinese American and Vietnamese American caregivers who provide substantial day-to-day care for a family member aged 55+ with dementia
Research approach:
Qualitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Recognition, Attitudes and Causal Beliefs regarding Dementia in Italian, Greek and Chinese Australians

Author/s: Low, L. F. Anstey, K. J. Lackersteen, S. M. Camit, M. Harrison, F. Draper, B. Brodaty, H. | Year: 2010 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia

Reference:

Key Words:
dementia, cross-cultural comparison
Research aim:
To investigate recognition, attitudes and causal beliefs regarding dementia in Italian, Greek and Chinese Australians in comparison with 3rd generation Australians.
Results/Conclusion:
Third generation participants (85%) were more likely to recognize dementia symptoms in a vignette in comparison to Italian (61%), Greek (58%) and Chinese (72%) participants. Overall, the racial and ethnic minority groups had more negative attitudes about persons with dementia. The racial and ethnic minority groups were more likely to suggest old age and psychosocial risk factors caused dementia, whereas 3rd generation Australians were more likely to suggest brain disease. Differences between ethnic minority and 3rd generation groups remained after controlling for sociodemographic variables.
Implications:
Racial and ethnic minority groups have poor dementia literacy in comparison to 3rd generation Australians. There is a need for dementia education targeted to and tailored for these groups.
Cultural Group(s):
Italian, Greek and Chinese, 3rd generation Australians
Location of study:
Age group:
18+
Number included in study:
350 Italian, 414 Greek, 437 Chinese, 500 3rd generation Australian
Type of participants:
Italian, Greek, Chinese and third-generation Australians
Research approach:
Quantitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Lost before translation : challenges and issues for people with dementia from CALD backgrounds

Author/s: Low, Lee-Fay | Year: 2009 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia

Reference:

Key Words:
dementia, assesment tools
Research aim:
discusses the challenges and problems of dementia and older people of non-English speaking background.
Results/Conclusion:
Often, because of language skills, the proper assessment of these older people are not possible, and they are often excluded from research studies. There is a poor awareness of early signs and symptoms of dementia in culturally and lingistically diverse communities ( CALD ), and at times a stigma is associated with the disease.
Implications:
there is a shortage of ethno-specific residential care that caters to the language and cultural needs of this group, and the author stresses the need for more services, facilities and research to improve the care of the growing number of the CALD elderly suffering from dementia.
Cultural Group(s):
CALD
Location of study:
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
Research approach:
Type of data:
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Comparative analysis of dementia and ethnicity in the New South Wales Aged Care Assessment Program: 1996 and 2001

Author/s: Lister, S.; Benson, C. | Year: 2006 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia

Reference: Lister, S. and C. Benson (2006). "Comparative analysis of dementia and ethnicity in the New South Wales Aged Care Assessment Program: 1996 and 2001." Australasian Journal on Ageing 25(1): 24-30.

Key Words:
dementia, cultural differences in dementia rates
Research aim:
To compare assessment and dementia rates for different client countries of birth in the New South Wales Aged Care Assessment Program (NSW ACAP)
Results/Conclusion:
ACAP assessment and dementia rates for people from several overseas-born groups in this study were significantly lower than those for Australian-born clients. Statistical differences were maintained for 1996 and 2001. Characteristics of those with dementia and born overseas were significantly different from Australian-born clients.
Implications:
Australian-born ACAP clients have higher assessment and dementia rates than many overseas-born groups
Cultural Group(s):
Overseas born, Australia born
Location of study:
New South Wales
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
Research approach:
Quantitative
Type of data:
Secondary
Secondary data sources used:
Aged Care Assessment Program (ACAP) and ABS data
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Help-seeking and service use for dementia in Italian, Greek and Chinese Australians

Author/s: Low, Lee-Fay Anstey, Kaarin J. Lackersteen, Steven M. P. Camit, Michael | Year: 2011 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: General care, Dementia

Reference:

Key Words:
service access, service use, Italian, Greek, Chinese
Research aim:
To explore the help-seeking strategies and the acceptance of services among a national sample of Italian, Greek and Chinese compared to third generation Australians.
Results/Conclusion:
The most frequently reported sources of help for all participants were general practitioners (55%), community organisations (27%) and family (26%). Significantly more racial minority participants reported that they would seek help from their families (32%) than did third generation Australians (13%). The percentage of participants who reported they would use aged care services were 96% for day activities, 95% for community nursing, 93% for bus outings, 91% for home help with housework, 88% for carer's support groups, 83% for nursing home care, 78% for one-week respite and 67% for Meals-on-Wheels. Racial minorities were equally or more likely to say that they would use some community-based services than third generation Australians and less likely to use residential respite. Italians were less likely to use permanent residential care. Acculturation parameters were inconsistently associated with help-seeking and service acceptability.
Implications:
Racial minority groups have a greater preference for community services than third generation Australians. There are differences between racial minority groups on help-seeking and acceptability of services. Education and outreach to these groups needs to be tailored.
Cultural Group(s):
Italian, Greek, Chinese, 3rd generation Australian
Location of study:
Australia (national)
Age group:
Number included in study:
350 Italian, 414 Greek, 437 Chinese and 500 third generation Australians
Type of participants:
Italian, Greek, Chinese and third-generation Australians
Research approach:
Quantitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes: