Database of Research on Ageing

73 results found

The Clock Drawing Test: Utility for Dementia Detection in Multiethnic Elders

Author/s: Borson, Soo Brush, Michael Gil, Eric Scanlan, James Vitaliano, Peter Chen, Jim Cashman, Judy Sta Maria, Mary M. Barnhart, Ross Roques, Jose | Year: 1999 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia

Reference: Borson, S., M. Brush, E. Gil, J. Scanlan, P. Vitaliano, J. Chen, J. Cashman, M. M. Sta Maria, R. Barnhart and J. Roques (1999). "The Clock Drawing Test: Utility for Dementia Detection in Multiethnic Elders." The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences 54(11): M534-M540.

Key Words:
dementia, culturally appropriate assessment tools
Research aim:
To compare the effectiveness of the Clock Drawing Test (CDT) for dementia detection was compared with that of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument (CASI) in community-dwelling elders of diverse linguistic, ethnic, and educational backgrounds.
Results/Conclusion:
All tests were significantly affected by education (p < .001) but not by primary language (p > .05). In poorly educated non-English speakers, the CDT detected demented subjects with higher sensitivity than the two longer instruments (sensitivity and specificity 85% and 94% for the CDT, 46% and 100% for the MMSE, and 75% and 95% for the CASI). Moreover, less information was lost due to noncompletion of the CDT than the MMSE or CASI (severe dementia or refusal: CDT 8%, MMSE 12%, and CASI 16%).
Implications:
Overall, the CDT may be as effective as the MMSE or CASI as a first-level dementia screen for clinical use in multiethnic, multilingual samples of older adults. Its brevity (1-5 minutes), minimal language requirements, high acceptability, and lack of dependence on specialized testing materials are well adapted for screening of non-English-speaking elderly persons in settings where bilingual interpreters are not readily available and screening time is at a premium.
Cultural Group(s):
Non-English speakers
Location of study:
United States
Age group:
Elderly (not further defined)
Number included in study:
295
Type of participants:
elderly persons enrolled in the University of Washington's Alzheimer's Disease Research Center Satellite Registry for underserved poor or minority elderly persons. Included n=151 English speaking, n=154 other language speaking
Research approach:
Quantitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Italian-speaking family caregivers of people with dementia: Report on focus groups with the Italian community

Author/s: Boughtwood, Desiree Gava, Silvana | Year: 2010 | Publication type: Report | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia, Informal Care

Reference: Boughtwood, D. and S. Gava (2010). Italian-speaking family caregivers of people with dementia: Report on focus groups with the Italian community, Aged Care Research Unit, Liverpool Hospital.

Key Words:
dementia, family care giving, infomal care
Research aim:
To outline the major issues for Italian family caregivers of people with dementia
Results/Conclusion:
Implications:
Recommendation 1: Improve information provision, Recommendation 2: Improve GPs service, Recommendation 3: Educate the general community, Recommendation 4: Hospitals to provide better care for older Italians, Recommendation 5: Clarification of practices and services, Recommendation 6: More Italian-speaking care staff in residential facilities, Recommendation 7: Take measures to ease financial burden, Recommendation 8: Support for carers, Recommendation 9: Italian welfare worker
Cultural Group(s):
Italian
Location of study:
New South Wales (West Sydney)
Age group:
mid-20's to 70's
Number included in study:
40 community members in focus groups
Type of participants:
family caregivers, ethno-specific and multicultural workers (meaning those who worked specifically with one community or CALD communities generally) bilingual general practitioners and geriatricians.
Research approach:
Qualitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Arabic speaking family caregivers of people with dementia: Report on focus groups with the Arabic community

Author/s: Boughtwood, Desiree Kourouche, Fatima | Year: 2010 | Publication type: Report | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia

Reference: Boughtwood, D. and F. Kourouche (2010). Arabic speaking family caregivers of people with dementia: Report on focus groups with the Arabic community, Aged Care Research Unit, Liverpool Hospital.

Key Words:
dementia, family care giving, infomal care
Research aim:
To outline the major issues for Arabic family caregivers of people with dementia
Results/Conclusion:
Implications:
Recommendation 1 - Improve GPs service, Recommendation 2 - Educate Arabic community, Recommendation 3 - Support carers to manage all aspects of dementia, Recommendation 4 - Improvements to services
Cultural Group(s):
Arabic
Location of study:
New South Wales (West Sydney)
Age group:
Late teens to early 90's
Number included in study:
35 community members in focus groups
Type of participants:
family caregivers, ethno-specific and multicultural workers (meaning those who worked specifically with one community or CALD communities generally) bilingual general practitioners and geriatricians.
Research approach:
Qualitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Spanish speaking family caregivers of people with dementia: Report on focus groups with the Spanish community

Author/s: Boughtwood, Desiree Rojas, Jorge Enrique Ferrerosa | Year: 2010 | Publication type: Report | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia

Reference: Boughtwood, D. and J. E. F. Rojas (2010). Spanish speaking family caregivers of people with dementia: Report on focus groups with the Spanish community, Aged Care Research Unit, Liverpool Hospital.

Key Words:
dementia, family care giving, infomal care
Research aim:
To outline the major issues for Spanish-speaking family caregivers of people with dementia
Results/Conclusion:
Implications:
Recommendation 1: More dementia resources in Spanish, Recommendation 2: Educate Spanish speaking community, Recommendation 3: Emotional support for carers, Recommendation 4: Practical assistance for carers, Recommendation 5: Financial help, Recommendation 6: Doctors to do home visits, Recommendation 7: More Spanish speaking specialists
Cultural Group(s):
Spanish speaking
Location of study:
New South Wales (West Sydney)
Age group:
mid-20s to mid-60's
Number included in study:
25 community members in focus groups
Type of participants:
family caregivers, ethno-specific and multicultural workers (meaning those who worked specifically with one community or CALD communities generally) bilingual general practitioners and geriatricians.
Research approach:
Qualitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) Families Dealing with Dementia: An Examination of the Experiences and Perceptions of Multicultural Community Link Workers

Author/s: Boughtwood, Desiree Shanley, Chris Adams, Jon Santalucia, Yvonne Kyriazopoulos, Helena Pond, Dimity Rowland, Jeffery | Year: 2011 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia

Reference: Boughtwood, D., C. Shanley, J. Adams, Y. Santalucia, H. Kyriazopoulos, D. Pond and J. Rowland (2011). "Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) Families Dealing with Dementia: An Examination of the Experiences and Perceptions of Multicultural Community Link Workers." Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology 26(4): 365-377.

Key Words:
dementia, family care giving, infomal care
Research aim:
To undertake an empirical investigation of multicultural workers' perspectives with regard to the cultural traditions informing CALD family care-giving, CALD families'understandings of the term 'carer' and family arrangements regarding care.
Results/Conclusion:
The central finding of this study is that multicultural workers perceive and experience many different influences on decisions made about family care-giving.
Implications:
few CALD families understand the term 'carer' or the implications of the term. This is an extremely important finding, considering the complex emotions and burdens many carers experience along with reports that CALD carers are reluctant to use services
Cultural Group(s):
Italian, Arabic, Spanish-speaking, Chinese
Location of study:
New South Wales (West Sydney)
Age group:
Number included in study:
24
Type of participants:
multicultural care workers
Research approach:
Qualitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Dementia information for culturally and linguistically diverse communities: sources, access and considerations for effective practice

Author/s: Boughtwood, Desiree Shanley, Christopher Adams, Jon Santalucia, Yvonne Kyriazopoulos, Helena Pond, Dimity Rowland, Jeffrey | Year: 2012 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia, General care

Reference: Boughtwood, D., C. Shanley, J. Adams, Y. Santalucia, H. Kyriazopoulos, D. Pond and J. Rowland (2012). "Dementia information for culturally and linguistically diverse communities: sources, access and considerations for effective practice." Australian Journal of Primary Health 18(3): 190-196.

Key Words:
dementia, family care giving, infomal care
Research aim:
The research questions this paper aimed to answer were: how do CALD communities get information about dementia; what are the main access issues; and how can information provision be improved?
Results/Conclusion:
The main findings that are relevant for improving policy and practice are: the need for a more strategic and coordinated approach to dissemination structures and processes; a greater emphasis on supporting and enhancing the interpersonal aspects of information provision; the need for a greater range of information for CALD communities; and the need to ensure information resources and processes reflect the circumstances and needs of these communities.mixed
Implications:
This will be most likely achieved if key stakeholders from within the CALD communities are directly involved in all stages of the development and dissemination of dementia information resources.
Cultural Group(s):
Italian, Arabic, Spanish-speaking, Chinese
Location of study:
New South Wales (West Sydney)
Age group:
Number included in study:
121 family carers, 24 bi-lingual/bi-cultural workers,16 bi-lingual GPs, 20 geriatricians
Type of participants:
family caregivers, multicultural workers, GPs, geriatricians
Research approach:
Qualitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
NVivo7
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:
importance of the interpersonal aspects of information dissemination. How well information is received, understood and evaluated is strongly affected by the characteristics of the person passing on the information.

The role of the bilingual/bicultural worker in dementia education, support and care

Author/s: Boughtwood, Desiree Shanley, Christopher Adams, Jon Santalucia, Yvonne Kyriazopoulos, Helena Rowland, Jeffrey Pond, Dimity | Year: 2013 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia

Reference: Boughtwood, D., C. Shanley, J. Adams, Y. Santalucia, H. Kyriazopoulos, J. Rowland and D. Pond (2013). "The role of the bilingual/bicultural worker in dementia education, support and care." Dementia 12(1): 7-21.

Key Words:
dementia, family care giving, infomal care
Research aim:
to gain a better understanding of the role of bilingual/bicultural workers within the dementia field.
Results/Conclusion:
Bilingual/bicultural workers play a significant and complex role in supporting individuals and families within their community who are affected by dementia
Implications:
The significance of their role needs to be more clearly acknowledged in the development of policy, further research and service provision within the dementia field.
Cultural Group(s):
Italian, Arabic, Spanish-speaking, Chinese
Location of study:
New South Wales (West Sydney)
Age group:
Number included in study:
24
Type of participants:
bilingual/bicultural workers
Research approach:
Qualitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Experiences and Perceptions of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Family Carers of People With Dementia

Author/s: Boughtwood, Desiree Leone Adams, Jon Shanley, Chris Santalucia, Yvonne Boughtwood, Desiree Leone Adams, Jon Shanley, Chris Santalucia, Yvonne Kyriazopoulos, Helena | Year: 2011 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia

Reference: Boughtwood, D. L., J. Adams, C. Shanley, Y. Santalucia and H. Kyriazopoulos (2011). "Experiences and Perceptions of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Family Carers of People With Dementia." American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias 26(4): 290-297.

Key Words:
dementia, family care giving, infomal care
Research aim:
The study examined the experiences and perceptions of these family carers from a CALD background with regard to their caregiving for a person living with dementia (PLWD)
Results/Conclusion:
Analysis revealed that while considerable similarities exist across the experiences and perceptions of carers from all 4 CALD communities, there were nevertheless some important distinctions across the different groups. Arabic-speaking and Chinese-speaking carers did not take an advocacy role in hospitals as described by the Italian-speaking and Spanish-speaking carers. Arabic-speaking and Chinesespeaking carers also reported less conflict with other family members about caregiving decisions than Italian-speaking and Spanish-speaking carers. Gender was not described as impacting care decisions in these latterCALDcommunities to the extent that it was by the Italian-speaking and Spanish-speaking carers participating in the study.Arabic-speaking carers expressedmuch emotion and grief about the condition of the PLWD, worry about the future, and the impact of caring on themselves. However, Arabic-speaking carers were also less concerned about dementia-related behaviors than the other 3 groups.Unlike carers from the other CALD communities, Chinese-speaking carers did not report worrying about the safety of the PLWD.
Implications:
Anglo-Australians were not included, which would enable more direct comparisons between CALD and non-CALD family carers.
Cultural Group(s):
Italian, Arabic, Spanish-speaking, Chinese
Location of study:
New South Wales (West Sydney)
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
Research approach:
Qualitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Chinese-speaking family caregivers of people with dementia: Report on focus groups with the Chinese community

Author/s: Boughtwood, Desiree Wu, Ying | Year: 2010 | Publication type: | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia

Reference: Boughtwood, D. and Y. Wu (2010). Chinese-speaking family caregivers of people with dementia: Report on focus groups with the Chinese community, Aged Care Research Unit, Liverpool Hospital.

Key Words:
dementia, family care giving, infomal care
Research aim:
To outline the major issues for Chinese family caregivers of people with dementia
Results/Conclusion:
Implications:
Recommendation 1: Educate the Chinese community, Recommendation 2: Improve information provision, Recommendation 3: Emotional and practical support for carers, Recommendation 4: More Chinese specific services, Recommendation 5: More respite care, Recommendation 6: Home visits from health professionals
Cultural Group(s):
Chinese
Location of study:
New South Wales (West Sydney)
Age group:
Number included in study:
37 community members in focus groups
Type of participants:
family caregivers, ethno-specific and multicultural workers (meaning those who worked specifically with one community or CALD communities generally) bilingual general practitioners and geriatricians.
Research approach:
Qualitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Strategic directions in CALD dementia research in Australia

Author/s: Cheng, A Cruysmans, B Draper, B Hayward-Wright, N Jeon, YH LoGiudice, D Zogalis, G | Year: 2009 | Publication type: Report | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia

Reference: Cheng, A., B. Cruysmans, B. Draper, N. Hayward-Wright, Y. Jeon, D. LoGiudice and G. Zogalis (2009). Strategic directions in CALD dementia research in Australia. Dementia Collaborative Research Centres (UNSW). 2.

Key Words:
dementia
Research aim:
eight experts in dementia research and/or dementia CALD service provision and advocacy were invited to submit a literature review on an assigned topic then a forum to discuss their findings and discuss with each other and key stakeholders. Review of findings/recommendations for future research directions across all topics in relation to Dementia: Epidemiology, Community knowledge, Carers, Service delivery, Screening and Assessment, Medical Management, Residential Aged Care, Staff and Training, Minority CALD
Results/Conclusion:
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
Location of study:
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
Research approach:
Type of data:
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:
A summary of recommendations for future research across all topics also included