450 results found

Community Profiles for Health Care Providers

Author/s: Abbato, S | Year: 2011 | Publication type: Report | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: General CALD, culturally appropriate care

Reference: Abbato, S. (2011). Community Profiles for Health Care Providers, Queensland Health.

Key Words:
resource for service providers, community profiles
Research aim:
Report containing a frofile of 18 different CALD birthplace groups in QLD to be used as a resource for health providers
Results/Conclusion:
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
18 CALD groups represented
Location of study:
Queensland
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
Research approach:
Type of data:
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:
Report with community profiles of 18 different CALD community groups in Queensland. Resource for health providers.

Ageing your way, my way – working together: Spiritus research into the emerging ageing CALD communities in Brisbane

Author/s: Abbato, S Durham, J | Year: 2011 | Publication type: Report | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: General Care, Culturally appropriate care

Reference: Abbato, S. and J. Durham (2011). Ageing your way, my way - working together: Spiritus research into the emerging ageing CALD communities in Brisbane. Brisbane, Spiritus HACC multicultural program.

Key Words:
emerging communities, culturally specific care, service access
Research aim:
The aim of this research is to facilitate connections between CALD communities and HACC services, to enable all Queenslanders, no matter what language or cultural background, to age with dignity and appropriate care.
Results/Conclusion:
Some of the findings confirmed existing knowledge - that the greatest issues for CALD seniors is isolation, even within their own families, that they lack knowledge and understanding of aged care services, and identify transport as a key unmet need. Less well known was the extent of small, un-funded and volunteer run community groups providing social services to their own communities. Leaders of these groups have established community networks, the trust of the community, the ability to organise social events for elders and also act as a liaison between service providers and the community. Some suggested strategies to link with and support these groups are identified. In all traditional cultures it is customary for younger members of the family to care for their aged. It is a clear duty of the younger people and an expectation by their elders. In Australia, the lifestyle is different and younger people are busy with work and their own families and have less capacity to do this. In many cases this unmet need is not spoken about as it is associated with 'loss of face', and shame. For many seniors, the shame is worse than the isolation.
Implications:
A separate report (Part 2) lists all the community organisations contacted for this research, as well as a couple already in the Queensland Multicultural Resource Directory (Queensland 2009). This list is provided as a resource for all HACC services, and participants agreed to publication with the proviso that it be made available only for this purpose. For this reason Part 2 of the report is available to HACC service providers only.
Cultural Group(s):
Pacific Islander, Vietnamese, people from the former Yugoslavia, Indian, Filipino, Central & South American, Sri Lankan and African
Location of study:
Brisbane
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
Research approach:
Qualitative
Type of data:
Primary and secondary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Type 2 diabetes prevalence varies by socio-economic status within and between migrant groups: analysis and implications for Australia

Author/s: Abouzeid, M. Philpot, B. Janus, E. D. Coates, M. J. Dunbar, J. A. | Year: 2013 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Physical Health

Reference: Abouzeid, M., B. Philpot, E. D. Janus, M. J. Coates and J. A. Dunbar (2013). "Type 2 diabetes prevalence varies by socio-economic status within and between migrant groups: analysis and implications for Australia." BMC Public Health 13.

Key Words:
diabetes, socioeconomic characteristics, prevelance rates
Research aim:
Given Australia's multicultural demography, we sought to identify groups at high risk of Type 2 Diabetes (T2DM) in Victoria, Australia.
Results/Conclusion:
Prevalence of diagnosed T2DM in Victoria was 4.1% (n = 98671) in men and 3.5% (n = 87608) in women. Of those with T2DM, over 1 in 5 born in Oceania and in Southern and Central Asia were aged under 50 years. For both men and women, odds of T2DM were higher for all migrant groups than the Australian-born reference population, including, after adjusting for age and SES, 6.3 and 7.2 times higher for men and women born in the Pacific Islands, respectively, and 5.2 and 5.0 times higher for men and women born in Southern and Central Asia, respectively. Effects of SES varied by region of birth.
Implications:
Across all socio-economic strata, all migrant groups have higher prevalence of T2DM than the Australian-born population. With increasing migration, this health gap potentially has implications for health service planning and delivery, policy and preventive efforts in Australia.
Cultural Group(s):
Varied - results discussed for Oceania, South and Central Asia, Pacific Islands
Location of study:
Victoria (Melbourne)
Age group:
not specific to older people
Number included in study:
186,279
Type of participants:
People with diabetes registered with the national diabetes scheme
Research approach:
Quantitative
Type of data:
Secondary
Secondary data sources used:
ABS Census data, National Diabetes Services Scheme
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Dementia prevalence and incidence among Australians who do not speak English at home

Author/s: Access Economics | Year: 2006 | Publication type: Report | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia, Demographic

Reference: Access Economics (2006). Dementia prevalence and incidence among Australians who do not speak English at home, Prepared for Alzheimer's Australia: 38.

Key Words:
dementia, demograpic data
Research aim:
The report provides a 'snapshot' of the prevalence and incidence of dementia among people from CALD backgrounds in Australia, based on current Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) demographic data.
Results/Conclusion:
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
CALD
Location of study:
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
Research approach:
Quantitative
Type of data:
Secondary
Secondary data sources used:
ABS Census data
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:
Based on current dementia prevelance rates for the total Australia population, projections of future dementia prevelance across different groups/states.

Keeping dementia front of mind: incidence and prevalence 2009-2050

Author/s: Access Economics | Year: 2009 | Publication type: Report | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia, Statistics

Reference: Access Economics (2009). Keeping dementia front of mind: Incidence and prevalence 2009-2050, Alzheimers Australia.

Key Words:
dementia, statistics, projections
Research aim:
Access Economics was commissioned by Alzheimer's Australia to provide up-to-date estimates and projections of prevalence and incidence for people with dementia in Australia, states and territories segregated into Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) populations and non- CALD populations, as well as metropolitan and regional (rural and remote) areas.
Results/Conclusion:
The prevalence of dementia is projected to increase over four-fold from 245,400 people in 2009 to around 1.13 million people by 2050. There is some evidence to suggest that there are many more with cognitive impairment.
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
CALD
Location of study:
Australia (national)
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
Research approach:
Quantitative
Type of data:
Secondary
Secondary data sources used:
ABS Census data
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Overseas workers for the aged care sector. Scoping paper

Author/s: Aged & Community Services Australia | Year: 2008 (updated 2011) | Publication type: Report | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: General Care

Reference: Aged & Community Services Australia (2008). Overseas workers for the aged care sector. Scoping paper. Melbourne, Aged & Community Services Australia.

Key Words:
aged care workforce, scoping paper, service provision, migrant workers
Research aim:
The ACSA Federation recognises a workforce shortage is also one of the main issues confronting the aged and community care sector. One of the areas it has identified for consideration is overseas workers.
Results/Conclusion:
Discussion report about the increasing demand for aged care workers and the possibility of using overseas workers to fill the gaps. literature review of the process, procedures and pros and cons of hiring overseas workers.
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
Location of study:
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
Research approach:
Type of data:
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:
Not primary research. Scoping paper about using migrant workers to fill the gap in aged care services workforce

Strength through diversity: culturally and linguistically diverse aged and community care

Author/s: Aged & Community Services Australia | Year: 2006 | Publication type: Policy Statement | Peer reviewed: No | Topic area/s: Service Provision, General CALD

Reference: Aged & Community Services Australia (2006) "Strength through diversity: culturally and linguistically diverse aged and community care" National policy position

Key Words:
Service Provsion, Older CALD People, policy
Research aim:
The best quality care is designed around the unique and complete needs of the individual. People from any particular ethnic or cultural group are different from one another. Values, opinions and family practices differ, English proficiency varies, just as their settlement experiences and lives in Australia have affected them differently. Culture is a complex phenomenon that is heterogeneous, flexible and continually changing. It belongs to every human being and not solely to people we view as 'others.' Culture is not a separate need, but rather a framework within which care and support is provided. ACSA's goal is to ensure the provision of culturally appropriate services for all as a result of having a culturally competent service system
Results/Conclusion:
ACSA believes that culture and communication are central issues which lie at the heart of care for all clients. The capacity of all agencies to respond appropriately to their local communities should be enhanced. A mixed service system that accommodates a range of needs, cultural and locational differences is an important and appropriate policy position.
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
CALD
Location of study:
Australia
Age group:
N/A
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
N/A
Research approach:
N/A
Type of data:
N/A
Secondary data sources used:
N/A
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Pharmacist elicited medication histories in the Emergency Department: Identifying patient groups at risk of medication misadventure

Author/s: Ajdukovic, M. Crook, M. Angley, C. Stupans, I. Soulsby, N. Doecke, C. Anderson, B. Angley, M. | Year: 2007 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Physical Health, Language and Translation

Reference: Ajdukovic, M., M. Crook, C. Angley, I. Stupans, N. Soulsby, C. Doecke, B. Anderson and M. Angley (2007). "Pharmacist elicited medication histories in the Emergency Department: Identifying patient groups at risk of medication misadventure." Pharmacy Practice 5(4): 162-168.

Key Words:
medications management, language barriers, residential care, emergency incidence
Research aim:
The elderly, in particular those residing in Residential Aged Care Facilities and those with a non-English speaking background, have been identified as patient groups vulnerable to medication misadventure. This study aimed to analyse the incidence of discrepancies in medication histories in these demographic groups when pharmacist elicited medication histories were compared with those taken by Emergency Department (ED) physicians. It also aimed to investigate the incidence of medication related ED presentations.
Results/Conclusion:
The number of correctly recorded medications was lowest in the 'language barrier group (13.8%) compared with 18% and 19.6% of medications for 'general' patients and patients from residential aged care facilities respectively. Seven of the patients (29.2%) with 'language barrier'; 1 from a residential aged care facility (8.3%) and 13 of the (20.3%) patients from the 'general' category were suspected as having a medication related ED presentation.
Implications:
This study further highlights the positive contribution an ED pharmacist can make to enhancing medication management along the continuum of care. This study also confirms the vulnerability of patients with language barrier to medication misadventure and their need for interpreter services at all stages of their hospitalisation, in particular at the point of ED presentation.
Cultural Group(s):
Non-English speaking background
Location of study:
South Australia
Age group:
70+
Number included in study:
100
Type of participants:
aged 70+ and take 5+ medications, have 3+ physical mobidities, been discharged from hospital within 3 months prior to the study.
Research approach:
Quantitative
Type of data:
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Assessing factors in utilisation of health services and community aged care by the Iranian elderly living in the Sydney metropolitan area: Acculturation aged care

Author/s: Alizadeh-Khoei, Mahtab | Year: 2008 | Publication type: PhD thesis | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: General Care

Reference: Alizadeh-Khoei, M. (2008). Assessing factors in utilisation of health services and community aged care by the Iranian elderly living in the Sydney metropolitan area: Acculturation aged care. PhD, University of Sydney.

Key Words:
Iranian, well-being, service use, access to services,
Research aim:
This study aims to identify the acculturation factors that affect the health status of Iranian-born elderly immigrants to Australia and their utilisation of health and community aged care services.
Results/Conclusion:
Results indicate Iranian migants suffer higher levels of psychological distress and are more limited in their physical functioning than the general population of older Australians. They are in greater need of assistance with activities of daily living, lower sense of wellbeing, are far less likely to utilise aged care services. Iranian women who do not speak English at home experience these disadvantages to an even greater extent. English language proficiency was the only factor found to affect whether Iranian elderly utilised health and community aged care services, while ability to engage in activities of daily living was the only variable associated with utilisation of community support services. This variable did not predict the utilisation of community support services in the broader sample of NSW respondents.
Implications:
The results of this study will be of value to Iranian elders, their families, and Australian aged health care service providers. The findings could also contribute towards enriched multicultural policy and improved social fairness, access to services, and equity for the aged from different ethnic backgrounds.
Cultural Group(s):
Iranian, broader population of older Australians
Location of study:
New South Wales (Sydney)
Age group:
65+
Number included in study:
302
Type of participants:
Iranians aged 65+ living in Sydney area for at least 6 months
Research approach:
Mixed methods
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
New South Wales Older Persons Health Survey 1999
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:
Paper about results from this thesis published in 2011

The Role of Acculturation in Health Status and Utilization of Health Services among the Iranian Elderly in Metropolitan Sydney

Author/s: Alizadeh-Khoei, Mahtab Mathews, R. Hossain, S. | Year: 2011 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: General Care

Reference: Alizadeh-Khoei, M., R. Mathews and S. Hossain (2011). "The Role of Acculturation in Health Status and Utilization of Health Services among the Iranian Elderly in Metropolitan Sydney." Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology 26(4): 397-405.

Key Words:
Iranian, health status, use of health services, acculturation, language proficiency and health
Research aim:
Explores the impact of acculturation on health status and use of health and community aged care services among elderly Iranian-born immigrants to Australia
Results/Conclusion:
Iranian immigrants had higher levels of psychological distress, more limited physical function, greater need for help or assistance with activities of daily living, lower feelings of wellbeing, and were much less likely to use aged care services than the general population of older Australians. Participants who did not speak English at home were more likely to experience psychological distress and had greater limitations in their physical functioning. Elderly Iranians with better English proficiency had lower levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms and reported less need for help and supervision in activities of daily living; they were also more likely to access health care services. Elderly Iranian immigrants experience higher levels of psychological distress and lower levels of physical function than the general population of older Australians; those with limited proficiency in English are at greatest risk.
Implications:
These findings contribute to the enrichment of multicultural policy, social fairness, access, and equity for ethnic aged people
Cultural Group(s):
Iranian, 'general' population of older Australian
Location of study:
New South Wales (Sydney)
Age group:
65+
Number included in study:
302
Type of participants:
Iranians aged 65+ living in Sydney area for at least 6 months
Research approach:
Mixed methods
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes: