8 results found

The Influence of Ethnicity and Culture on the Caregiver Stress and Coping Process: A Sociocultural Review and Analysis

Author/s: Aranda, María P. Knight, Bob G. | Year: 1997 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Carers who are CALD, Informal Care

Reference: Aranda, M. P. and B. G. Knight (1997). "The Influence of Ethnicity and Culture on the Caregiver Stress and Coping Process: A Sociocultural Review and Analysis." The Gerontologist 37(3): 342-354.

Key Words:
Latino, carers, coping and stress, CALD carers
Research aim:
The authors review the literature on ethnic minority caregivers and suggest that ethnicity and culture play a significant role in the stress and coping process for Latino caregivers.
Results/Conclusion:
Caregivers of older Latinos face special challenges in the caregiving for individuals at higher risk for specific chronic diseases, who are disabled at earlier ages, and who have more functional disabilities. Ethnicity and culture can also influence the appraisal of stress events, the perception and use of family support, and coping behaviors. Socioeconomic class and minority group status are discussed as additional sources of variation in the caregiver stress and coping model.
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
Latino
Location of study:
United States
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
Research approach:
Literature review
Type of data:
Literature review
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:
Not primary research - literature review of previous research

End of Life Care: The Importance of Culture and Ethnicity

Author/s: Clark, K. Phillips, J. | Year: 2010 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: Yes | Topic area/s: High Level Care, Palliative Care

Reference: Clark, K. and J. Phillips (2010) "End of Life Care: The Importance of Culture and Ethnicity" Australian Family Physician 39(4):210-213

Key Words:
Health Services, Palliative Care, CALD, Cultural understanding
Research aim:
This article discusses how cultural diversity may impact care and provides some strategies for the general practitioner when considering the provision of end of life care.
Results/Conclusion:
This article does not attempt to provide GPs with a prescriptive approach to multicultural care, as this would run the risk of stereotyping individuals. Rather, it discusses the barriers to end of life care among different cultural and ethnic groups, and suggests ways in which to improve understanding of different cultural needs in end of life care.
Implications:
Taking the time to understand each patient's unique cultural needs, values and beliefs is the most respectful way of delivering palliative care and facilitating a dignified death.
Cultural Group(s):
CALD
Location of study:
Australia
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
Literature review
Research approach:
Type of data:
Literature review
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Muslims in Australian hospitals: The clash of cultures

Author/s: Evans, David Jones, Tina Mohammadi, Nooredin | Year: 2007 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Culturally Appropriate Care

Reference: Evans, D., T. Jones and N. Mohammadi (2007). "Muslims in Australian hospitals: The clash of cultures." International Journal of Nursing Practice 13(5).

Key Words:
Muslims, culturally appropriate care, nursing
Research aim:
This paper highlights issues that Muslim patients face when hospitalized in Australia. Islamic principles will be presented and the impact this has on the health-care provision of Muslim people will be explored.
Results/Conclusion:
it is likely that strategies have not been developed to manage many of the issues that are important to Muslim patients; for example, the provision of halal food,14 privacy for women, observing hijab and segregation of genders on wards,15 prayer facility16-20 and visiting. (p.313). The clash of cultures is not an inevitable event, but can be avoided if nurses and other health-care providers ensure the provision of care is flexible enough to incorporate the priorities and needs of the culturally diverse Australian community. Australian health care must reflect the multicultural nature of the community it serves.
Implications:
Results highlight the importance of having strategies that identify the needs and expectations of culturally diverse consumers of the hospital system
Cultural Group(s):
Muslim
Location of study:
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
Research approach:
Discussion paper
Type of data:
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Exploring the Role of Family and Older People’s Access to Food in Different Cultures: Will the Children be There to Help?

Author/s: Radermacher, Harriet Feldman, Susan Lorains, Felicity Bird, Stephen | Year: 2010 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: General Wellbeing, Food Security, Informal Care

Reference:

Key Words:
intergenerational support, food security, nutrition, access
Research aim:
This article draws on the concepts of intergenerational exchange to further understand and explore older people's experiences of accessing nutritious food in a country where cultural diversity is a hallmark of the population.
Results/Conclusion:
The role of family and supportive intergenerational networks emerges as particularly significant within the current climate of rapid social and economic change. Participants appear ambivalent about receiving assistance from their adult children, and question the capacity of their children to assist given the increasing pressures and responsibilities that their adult children face.
Implications:
We conclude by proposing that appropriate and effective local government services that build on the strengths of existing family networks may continue to ensure that older people have access to nutritious food they want and need.
Cultural Group(s):
Anglo-Celtic, Macedonian, Serbian, Maltese
Location of study:
Victoria (Melbourne)
Age group:
58-90
Number included in study:
44
Type of participants:
older people from Anglo-Celtic, Macedonian, Serbian and Maltese backgrounds
Research approach:
Mixed methods
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:
This article is related to another article by same authors in 2010

Behavioural and psychological signs and symptoms of dementia across cultures: current status and the future

Author/s: Shah, A Dalvi, M Thompson, T | Year: 2005 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia, Biomedical

Reference: Shah, A., M. Dalvi and T. Thompson (2005) "Behavioural and psychological signs and symptoms of dementia across cultures: current status and the future" International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 20(12):1187-1195

Key Words:
Dementia, CALD, Developing Countries, Systematic Review
Research aim:
Behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) have been poorly studied in developing countries, in ethnic minority groups in a given country and in cross-national studies. The literature on BPSD from developing countries, ethnic minority groups in a given country and cross-national studies was examined.
Results/Conclusion:
There is emerging literature on BPSD from the settings was studied. These studies provide useful preliminary data on the prevalence and correlates of BPSD. Moreover, the data illustrate possible cross-cultural differences in BPSD and their correlates. A number of instruments measuring either individual BPSD within a BPSD domain, measuring features of a BPSD domain or features of a range of BPSD domains have been developed in languages other than English for use in developing countries and ethnic minority groups in a given country. Conclusions There is a need for methodologically similar and uniform studies of BPSD across countries and ethnic groups in a given country using appropriately validated instruments.
Implications:
It is suggested that a consensus should be reached by researchers on the best instrument(s) to be developed in languages other than English for use in these settings and, in turn, these instruments should be developed using appropriate methodology. This could allow identification of the genetic and environmental aetiology of BPSD and the influence of gene-environment interaction.
Cultural Group(s):
Developing Countries, ethnic minority groups, cross-national
Location of study:
International
Age group:
Number included in study:
Number of studies not given
Type of participants:
Peer reviewed journal articles
Research approach:
Type of data:
Literature review
Secondary data sources used:
Peer reviewed journal articles
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Belonging to a Victorian Community Choir: Ageing, Music and Culture

Author/s: Southcott, Jane Joseph, Dawn | Year: 2009 | Publication type: Conference paper | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: General Wellbeing, Social Inclusion and Engagement

Reference:

Key Words:
Bosnian, community participation, singing, well being
Research aim:
This study will explore ageing and cultural diversity within Australian society through an examination of community arts engagement, specifically a community choir in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Results/Conclusion:
This paper reports on how music engagement can facilitate successful ageing by encouraging a sense of community, enhancing well-being and supporting cultural identity. Found that participating in the choir added to sense of belonging and family, wellbeing, cultural identity
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
Bosnian
Location of study:
Victoria
Age group:
65+
Number included in study:
2
Type of participants:
1 male and 1 female Bosnian who participate in a choir
Research approach:
Qualitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Part of a larger study: 'Well being and ageing: community, diversity and the arts in Victoria'
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Passing on Our Culture: How Older Australians from Diverse Cultural Backgrounds Contribute to Civil Society

Author/s: Warburton, Jeni McLaughlin, Deirdre | Year: 2007 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: General Wellbeing

Reference:

Key Words:
CALD, indigenous, contributions to society, intergerational care
Research aim:
The aim of the present paper is to explore how older Australians from CALD backgrounds contribute to community using qualitative data from a larger study of the lived experiences of older Australians.
Results/Conclusion:
Findings suggest that respondents are very active within their families and communities in ways that differ from mainstream older Australians. Generally, they have an important role in maintaining or promoting their culture; and providing support across their communities based on common experience. In particular, respondents describe a special relationship with the young within their communities. This includes being a grandparent or elderly advisor, as well as the role that many Indigenous elders play in encouraging and supporting troubled young people.
Implications:
Although further and more representative studies of older Australians are now needed, this paper, nevertheless, begins to explore what has been a neglected area of ageing policy and research.
Cultural Group(s):
Greece, Italy, Hungary, Holland, Germany, Philippines, Vietnam, Indigenous Australians
Location of study:
Queensland
Age group:
55-93
Number included in study:
Not specified
Type of participants:
older CALD Australians
Research approach:
Qualitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Does diet matter for survival in long-lived cultures?

Author/s: Wahlqvist, M. L. Darmadi-Blackberry, I. Kouris-Blazos, A. Jolley, D. Steen, B. Lukito, W. Horie, Y. | Year: 2005 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: General Wellbeing, Food and Nutrition

Reference:

Key Words:
food, nutrition, cross cultural study, mediterranean diet, survival predictors, Greek
Research aim:
a cross-cultural study to determine to what extent health, social and lifestyle variables, especially food intake, collectively predict survival amongst long-lived cultures. (In 1987, the International Union of Nutritional Sciences (IUNS) subcommittee on Nutrition and Ageing, in conjunction with the World Health Organization (WHO) global program for the elderly, embarked on the 'Food Habits in Later Life' (FHILL) study.
Results/Conclusion:
1) it was found that being an elderly Greek in Australia conferred the lowest mortality risk and being an elderly Greek in Greece conferred the highest mortality risk. 2) the memory score, the Mediterranean diet score, Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and general health status scores showed the greatest effects in significantly reducing mortality hazard ratios. Of the lifestyle (modifiable) variables entered in the multivariate model, exercise and social activity were not significant predictors of survival suggesting that diet is a more important predictor of survival than these variables. 3) Diet, particularly the Mediterranean Diet, operates irrespective and together with other factors as an appreciable contributor to survival, with a strength comparable to or greater than all other measured variables.
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
International including Greeks in Australia, Anglo-Celts in Australia
Location of study:
International
Age group:
70+
Number included in study:
818
Type of participants:
Aged 70+ recruited from International Union of Nutritional Sciences (IUNS) centres
Research approach:
Quantitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Cox Proportional Hazard model
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:
Interesting study as it includes older Greeks in Australia and older Greeks in Greece for comparison