Database of Research on Ageing

21 results found

Responding to culturally and linguistically diverse carers: carers’ voices

Author/s: Multicultural Communities Council SA | Year: 2007 | Publication type: Report | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Carers who are CALD, Informal Care

Reference:

Key Words:
CALD carers, consulation, service access, perceptions
Research aim:
The project's core aims are to give carers in culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities a voice; to identify their needs; and to review current service responses to this sector.
Results/Conclusion:
All communities highlighted a range of issues they found difficult to deal with including: emotional issues of caring, tiredness and stress, challenges with difficult behaviours, lack of community/family support, language barriers, the need for more respite, the need for more transport. The focus in the report has been on providing information in an easy to read format which will aid decsion making processes for funding and program design.
Implications:
A set of 15 recommendations to support CALD carers was put forward.
Cultural Group(s):
Italian, Greek, Dutch, Vietnamese, Cambodian, Chinese, Latvian, German, Polish, Ukrainian, Hungarian, Jewish and Croatian.
Location of study:
South Australia
Age group:
Number included in study:
222 carers, 46 organisational stakeholders
Type of participants:
CALD carers and organisational stakeholders
Research approach:
Mixed methods
Type of data:
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

In their own right: Assessing the needs of carers in diverse communities

Author/s: Multicultural Mental Health Australia | Year: 2004 | Publication type: Report | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Carers who are CALD, Mental Health

Reference:

Key Words:
CALD carers, mental health, service provision
Research aim:
The project aimed to examine the effectiveness of the Carer Profile assessment strategy, which examined the value of carer assessment in supporting carer/family relationships for carers from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds caring for a relative or a friend with a mental illness.
Results/Conclusion:
It was concluded that the Carer Profile was effective in assessing carers' needs and supporting them in their caring role, and should be adapted as a core part of mental health services.
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
Chinese, Greek
Location of study:
New South Wales
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
CALD carers and service providers
Research approach:
Mixed methods
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Supporting Carers from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Backgrounds

Author/s: Northern Sydney Carer Support Service (NSW Health) | Year: 2011 | Publication type: Website | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Carers who are CALD, Internet Resources

Reference:

Key Words:
internet-based resource, CALD carers, carers
Research aim:
This page contains some important information and contacts about services available in the Northern Sydney region for Carers, both ethno-specific and generic.
Results/Conclusion:
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
Location of study:
New South Wales (North Sydney)
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
Research approach:
Type of data:
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:
Resource for service providers and CALD carers in the North Sydney region.

Evaluation of Carers Action Plan 2007-2012: final report

Author/s: Nous Group, | Year: 2012 | Publication type: Report | Peer reviewed: No | Topic area/s: Carers of CALD Older People, Not Specific to CALD

Reference: Nous Group (2012) "Evaluation of Carers Action Plan 2007-2012: final report" Report for NSW Department of Family and Community Services: Ageing, Disability and Home Care, Sydney

Key Words:
Caregivers, Carers Action Plan, NSW
Research aim:
An evaluation of the 2007 Carers Action Plan in NSW with the objective of informing future carers' policy.
Results/Conclusion:
The evaluation also identified the conditions that had changed for carers and their families. The overwhelming majority of initiatives in the CAP were delivered. There is some evidence of an increase in the number of carers supported. Carer satisfaction increased in recent years and initiatives delivered under the CAP contributed to this. NSW government agencies believed the CAP supported an interagency response to carer issues and led to more active consideration of carers in policy development and service delivery.
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
Not specific to CALD
Location of study:
New South Wales
Age group:
Not specified - stakeholders such as government agencies, peak bodies, service providers and carers.
Number included in study:
Not specified
Type of participants:
Stakeholders - government agencies, peak bodies, service providers and carers.
Research approach:
Mixed methods
Type of data:
Mixed
Secondary data sources used:
Ageing, Disability and Home Care (ADHC) Minimum Data set and desk top review of key documents
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) Carer Framework: strategies to meet the needs of carers

Author/s: NSW Department of Health | Year: 2009 | Publication type: Report | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Carers who are CALD

Reference:

Key Words:
CALD carers, strategic plan, support for CALD carers, CALD carer framework
Research aim:
The CALD Carer Framework identifies a whole range of strategies and evidence-based research to assist Government agencies to work towards the priority of identifying and supporting hidden carers.
Results/Conclusion:
Five priority action areas were identified: carers are recognised, respected and valued, hidden carers are identified and supported, services for carers and the people they care for are improved, carers are partners in care, carers are supported to combine caring and work.
Implications:
The CALD carers framework should be distributed to those stakeholders responsible for the implementation of the NSW Carers Action Plan, including AHS Carer Support Officer. This Guideline is a supplement to the NSW Carers Action Plan 2007-2012
Cultural Group(s):
CALD
Location of study:
New South Wales
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
Research approach:
Mixed methods
Type of data:
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Meeting the Respite Needs of Carers Living in Perth from a Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Background

Author/s: O'Toole, Marie | Year: 2012 | Publication type: PhD thesis | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: General Care

Reference:

Key Words:
respite, CALD carers, service access
Research aim:
The aim of this research is to examine the nature and drivers of exclusion from respite services for culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) carers living in Perth. The research seeks to find out if CALD carers need respite, if their needs are being met and if not, to identify the barriers and how they can be addressed.
Results/Conclusion:
My findings indicate that CALD carers, according to participants in this research, can find the respite system difficult to navigate, are unable to access services due to cultural and language barriers, and that support offered is often inflexible and unresponsive to their needs. The research also found that some CALD carers are prohibited by cultural and community pressures from seeking external support, and there is subsequently a need for CALD communities and carers to acknowledge the importance of carers looking after themselves.
Implications:
Addressing this situation will require the government to undertake a systemic re-engineering of the current model of carer respite, which I believe needs to be driven by CALD carers themselves to ensure that their needs are identified on their own terms rather than being defined by external 'experts'. In the meantime, my findings suggest that service providers can improve access and inclusion for CALD carers within the current system by developing more person-centred service responses, improving their cultural competency and working more closely with each other.
Cultural Group(s):
CALD
Location of study:
Western Australia (Perth)
Age group:
Number included in study:
7
Type of participants:
staff members from 5 organisations who understand and deal with CALD clients
Research approach:
Qualitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Difficulties experienced by carers from non-English-speaking backgrounds in using health and other support services

Author/s: Plunkett, Angela Quine, Susan | Year: 1996 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Carers who are CALD, Informal Care

Reference:

Key Words:
CALD carers, access to services, barriers to service use
Research aim:
The study objective was to document the experiences of carers from a non-English speaking background in using health and other support services in order to understand the reasons for underutilisation.
Results/Conclusion:
Some of the difficulties experienced in using services were common to many carers, irrespective of background, whereas others related specifically to English language deficits and cultural differences. Carers were reluctant to institutionalise a family member, despite their own health problems, emphasising the need for greater support from existing and expanded services to enable the relative to be cared for at home.
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
Non-English speaking background
Location of study:
New South Wales (Sydney)
Age group:
Number included in study:
40
Type of participants:
female carers from a CALD background
Research approach:
Qualitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Issues faced by carers of people with a mental illness from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds: Carers’ and practitioners’ perceptions

Author/s: Rooney, Rosanna Wright, Bernadette O'Neil, Krissa | Year: 2006 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Carers who are CALD

Reference:

Key Words:
CALD carers, mental health, support services, perceptions
Research aim:
This paper involves the examination of the perceptions of carers from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds regarding their conceptualisations of mental illness, stress and support, stigma, and pathways to seeking help. The carers' and the treating practitioners' perceptions of these issues are then compared.
Results/Conclusion:
A number of difficulties experienced by carers from CALD backgrounds were highlighted. These included a lack of involvement in the treatment process, insufficient communication from health professionals, lack of understanding about mental illness, lack of support, increased stress, and a lack of understanding of explanatory models between carer and practitioner.
Implications:
The development of a preventative intervention strategy that is culturally compatible with the carer's perception of caregiving is needed. From a preventative perspective, the mental health of primary carers, particularly those from disadvantaged communities, needs to be addressed.
Cultural Group(s):
Italian, Vietnamese, Indian, Spanish-speaking
Location of study:
Age group:
Number included in study:
9
Type of participants:
carers of clients with a mental illness from specified CALD background
Research approach:
Qualitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Project Report on the Study into the Needs of Carers from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Communities in the Nepean Area

Author/s: Sedger, Robyn Boyde, Diane | Year: 2008 | Publication type: Report | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Carers who are CALD

Reference:

Key Words:
infomal care, CALD carers, Greek, Macedonian, Arabic-speaking, Filipino, service access, HACC services
Research aim:
To explore Issues related specifically to the use of HACC and other disability services by CALD community members in the Nepean area. Local research was required so that local services could understand the issues and begin to address the issue of under-utilisation of services by carers from CALD backgrounds. The report describes a qualitative study into the service use needs of carers from culturally and linguistically diverseCALD communities in the Nepean area in 2007.
Results/Conclusion:
1) The majority of CALD carers and other participants in the Nepean area who participated in this study stated that they not only had a need for community care services but that they were willing to use these services. This result is contrary to prevailing misbeliefs/ misconceptions that "CALD communities do not demand or need services because they will look after their own" (NSW Aged Care Alliance, 2004, p.12). 2) The prevailing message from all four focus groups was that CALD communities who are potential system users are not able to access community services information. Very few participants (no participants within the Arabic speaking group) were aware of the role of, nor had ever heard of, Commonwealth Carelink Centres. 3) Participants within each of the four focus groups offered strategies which they felt could be used to overcome these barriers to information access. These strategies included the distribution of relevant language multi modal material distributed through exposure points such as medical officers, pharmacists, churches, guest speakers at social groups, print and electronic media, and Centrelink mail outs, as well as a centralised point for information access and language specific instructions on agency answering machines. In addition, the Filipino group discussed the need for visually attractive material, including culturally relevant images. 4) families declared that they were unaware how to access the 'system' and they didn't know where to start, who to talk to or what to do. 5) researchers observed that there was some dependence on the interpreters for effective communication in each of the focus groups, no matter the length of settlement since migration. - The level of dependence, however, did appear to be connected to the length of time that communities had been settled in Australia and consequently, whether the group included participants who had been born in Australia, and also the probability of exposure to English language development prior to migration. Also observable differences in need for an interpreter based on Socioeconomic status and the likelihood of expose to higher education/English language. 6) the researchers became aware of the need for caution when deciding on the need for interpreters for any community group or family; and that members of CALD communities may be disadvantaged if interpreters are not offered or available, regardless of the level of English language proficiency perceived by the community services worker
Implications:
There are some commonalities across groups but also differences in the experiences of people from different cultural groups explored in this study in access, barriers and preferences for services. Many similarities between the four focus groups were evident: 1. That participation in these focus groups was perceived to be a whole community concern, because the issue was viewed as a whole community issue. 2. A strong sense of familial obligation was evident within all four focus groups. However, this was not always matched by the carers capacity to provide the care required. 3. The type of service that was most in need, i.e. most participants across the four focus groups stated that their priority was for lawn mowing and personal care services . 4. Most participants also stated that when they received information about community care services, this information was in English. 5. Participants stated that interpreters were generally offered when accessing health services but not generally when accessing community care services. Issues of shame (regarding the need for an interpreter) and not knowing how to ask for an interpreter were also widespread among the focus groups Key differnces between groups: - Greek did not expect to be cared for by family as much as newer migrant groups, Arabic-speaking group less well resourced than other groups and this group also expressed concern about lack of consistency in workers making it difficult to build trust, lack of social capital in Arabic and Filipino group where community connectedness was obvious in the Greek and Macedonian groups
Cultural Group(s):
Greek, Arabic-speaking, Macedonian, Filipino
Location of study:
New South Wales (Nepean area)
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
CALD (informal) carers
Research approach:
Qualitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

A qualitative study into the use of formal services for dementia by carers from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities

Author/s: Shanley, Christopher Boughtwood, Desiree Adams, Jon Santalucia, Yvonne Kyriazopoulos, Helena Pond, Dimity Rowland, Jeffrey | Year: 2012 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Carers who are CALD, Dementia

Reference:

Key Words:
CALD carers, informal care, dementia
Research aim:
This study addresses a lack of literature on the use of formal services for dementia by people from CALD backgrounds by examining the experiences and perceptions of dementia caregiving within four CALD communities - Italian, Chinese, Spanish and Arabic-speaking - in south western Sydney, Australia.
Results/Conclusion:
People from CALD communities are often unfamiliar with the concept of formal services and there may be strong cultural norms about maintaining care within the family, rather than relying on external services. There is a preference for services that will allow families to keep their relative at home, for safety as well as cultural reasons, and they are particularly reluctant to use residential care. While there is a preference for ethno-specific or multicultural services, mainstream services also need to ensure they are more flexible in providing culturally appropriate care.
Implications:
While members of CALD communities may have difficulties accessing formal services, they will use them if they are culturally and linguistically appropriate and can meet their needs. There are a number of ways to improve service
Cultural Group(s):
Italian, Chinese, Spanish, Arabic speaking
Location of study:
New South Wales (Sydney)
Age group:
Number included in study:
121 family carers, 60 health professionals
Type of participants:
family carers of CALD with dementia, health professionals
Research approach:
Qualitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes: