Database of Research on Ageing

73 results found

Dementia Care Experiences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Communities: Project Summary

Author/s: Alzheimer's Australia | Year: 2013 | Publication type: Project brief (new research project) | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia

Reference: Alzheimer's Australia (2013). Dementia Care Experiences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Communities: Project Summary.

Key Words:
dementia, social inclusion, health literacy
Research aim:
The aim of the project is to establish what dementia care services can do to improve dementia awareness and reduce risks associated with dementia care in culturally and linguistically diverse (CaLD) communities in the Brisbane area.
Results/Conclusion:
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
Location of study:
Brisbane
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
Research approach:
Type of data:
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Perceptions of dementia in ethnic communities

Author/s: Alzheimer's Australia | Year: 2008 | Publication type: Report | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia, Culturally appropriate care

Reference: Alzheimer's Australia (2008). Perceptions of dementia in ethnic communities, Alzheimer's Australia 32.

Key Words:
dementia, perceptions, culturally appropriate care
Research aim:
to develop a resource kit outlining dementia perceptions in different ethnic communities.To assist organizations working with CALD clients to better understand the background of consumers they are supporting and develop appropriate services to assist their clients.
Results/Conclusion:
Implications:
Looking across the twelve community profiles, it is often the commonality of perceptions that is noteworthy and it demonstrates the need for information and support to all people, irrespective of our cultural or linguistic backgrounds.
Cultural Group(s):
Arabic, Chinese, Croatian, Greek, Italian, Macedonian, Polish, Russian, Serbian, Spanish, Turkish and Vietnamese
Location of study:
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
Research approach:
Qualitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Dementia prevalence and incidence among Australians who do not speak English at home

Author/s: Access Economics | Year: 2006 | Publication type: Report | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia, Demographic

Reference: Access Economics (2006). Dementia prevalence and incidence among Australians who do not speak English at home, Prepared for Alzheimer's Australia: 38.

Key Words:
dementia, demograpic data
Research aim:
The report provides a 'snapshot' of the prevalence and incidence of dementia among people from CALD backgrounds in Australia, based on current Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) demographic data.
Results/Conclusion:
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
CALD
Location of study:
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
Research approach:
Quantitative
Type of data:
Secondary
Secondary data sources used:
ABS Census data
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:
Based on current dementia prevelance rates for the total Australia population, projections of future dementia prevelance across different groups/states.

Keeping dementia front of mind: incidence and prevalence 2009-2050

Author/s: Access Economics | Year: 2009 | Publication type: Report | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia, Statistics

Reference: Access Economics (2009). Keeping dementia front of mind: Incidence and prevalence 2009-2050, Alzheimers Australia.

Key Words:
dementia, statistics, projections
Research aim:
Access Economics was commissioned by Alzheimer's Australia to provide up-to-date estimates and projections of prevalence and incidence for people with dementia in Australia, states and territories segregated into Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) populations and non- CALD populations, as well as metropolitan and regional (rural and remote) areas.
Results/Conclusion:
The prevalence of dementia is projected to increase over four-fold from 245,400 people in 2009 to around 1.13 million people by 2050. There is some evidence to suggest that there are many more with cognitive impairment.
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
CALD
Location of study:
Australia (national)
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
Research approach:
Quantitative
Type of data:
Secondary
Secondary data sources used:
ABS Census data
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Dementia in Australia: National data analysis and development

Author/s: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare | Year: 2006 | Publication type: Report | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia, National surveys

Reference: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2006). Dementia in Australia: National data analysis and development. Canberra, AIHW: 335.

Key Words:
Research aim:
This report about dementia for all groups, some findings related to CALD
Results/Conclusion:
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
Location of study:
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
Research approach:
Qualitative
Type of data:
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

The Value of Telephone Support Groups Among Ethnically Diverse Caregivers of Persons With Dementia

Author/s: Bank, Adam L. Argüelles, Soledad Rubert, Mark Eisdorfer, Carl Czaja, Sara J. | Year: 2006 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Carers who are CALD

Reference: Bank, A. L., S. Argüelles, M. Rubert, C. Eisdorfer and S. J. Czaja (2006). "The Value of Telephone Support Groups Among Ethnically Diverse Caregivers of Persons With Dementia." The Gerontologist 46(1): 134-138.

Key Words:
CALD carers, support, ICTs
Research aim:
This article provides a demonstration of the usefulness of technology for conducting telephone-based support groups in ethnically diverse dementia caregivers.
Results/Conclusion:
Eighty-one percent of the participants found the group "valuable," largely because of the social and emotional support and useful information obtained from other group members. The majority of caregivers also reported that their participation had increased their knowledge and skills as caregivers.
Implications:
The findings demonstrate that telecommunications technology can overcome the often formidable logistical problems faced by both English- and Spanish-speaking caregivers, and it can provide benefits similar to those obtained in face-to-face support groups.
Cultural Group(s):
White Americans, Cuban Americans
Location of study:
United States
Age group:
Number included in study:
41
Type of participants:
White and Cuban American dementia caregivers participating in the Resources for Enhancing Alzheimer's Caregiver Health (known as REACH) program
Research approach:
Qualitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Resources for Enhancing Alzheimer's Caregiver Health study (REACH)
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

The Validity of the Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale (RUDAS) in a Multicultural Cohort of Community-dwelling Older Persons With Early Dementia

Author/s: Basic, David Rowland, Jeffrey T. Conforti, David A. Vrantsidis, Freda Hill, Keith LoGiudice, Dina Harry, Jan M. Lucero, Katherine Prowse, Robert J. | Year: 2009 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia

Reference: Basic, D., J. T. Rowland, D. A. Conforti, F. Vrantsidis, K. Hill, D. LoGiudice, J. M. Harry, K. Lucero and R. J. Prowse (2009). "The Validity of the Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale (RUDAS) in a Multicultural Cohort of Community-dwelling Older Persons With Early Dementia." Alzheimer Disease & Associated Disorders April/June 23(2): 124-129.

Key Words:
RUDAS, dementia, assessment tools, culturally appropriate care
Research aim:
The Validity of the Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale (RUDAS) in a Multicultural Cohort of Community-dwelling Older Persons With Early Dementia. It can be directly translated to other languages, without the need to change the structure or the format of any item. This project investigated how RUDAS performs when detecting dementia and cognitive impairment for different groups.
Results/Conclusion:
In the primary analysis (normal subjects vs. those with definite dementia), the RUDAS accurately identified dementia, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.94 (95% confidence interval, 0.88-0.97); at the published cut point of less than 23/30, the positive likelihood ratio (LR) for dementia diagnosis was 8.77, and the negative likelihood ratio was 0.14. Additional analyses showed that the RUDAS performed less well when subjects with cognitive impairment (not dementia) were included. In all logistic regression models, the RUDAS was an independent predictor of dementia (odds ratio 0.64, 95% confidence interval, 0.52-0.79, primary analysis model), after adjusting for age, sex, years of education, and cultural diversity, none of which were independent predictors.
Implications:
Further studies are needed across the full spectrum of early dementia syndromes, and in additional ethnic minority groups.
Cultural Group(s):
CALD
Location of study:
Melbourne, Adelaide
Age group:
mean age 77
Number included in study:
151
Type of participants:
culturally diverse community-dwelling subjects of mean age 77 years
Research approach:
Type of data:
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale, Mini-Mental State Examination and General Practitioner Assessment of Cognition in a multicultural cohort of community-dwelling older persons with early dementia

Author/s: Basic, David Khoo, Angela Conforti, David Rowland, Jeffrey Vrantsidis, Freda LoGiudice, Dina Hill, Keith Harry, Jan Lucero, Katherine Prowse, Robert | Year: 2009 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia

Reference: Basic, D., A. Khoo, D. Conforti, J. Rowland, F. Vrantsidis, D. LoGiudice, K. Hill, J. Harry, K. Lucero and R. Prowse (2009). "Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale, Mini-Mental State Examination and General Practitioner Assessment of Cognition in a multicultural cohort of community-dwelling older persons with early dementia." Australian Psychologist 44(1): 40-53.

Key Words:
Research aim:
To compare three measures in their ability to detect dementia among older CALD were compared in 151 older, community-dwelling persons.
Results/Conclusion:
All three instruments were equally accurate in predicting dementia (ROC area under curve 0.92?0.97, p > 0.05 for all comparisons). At the recommended cut-offs, the RUDAS was best for ruling in dementia (positive LR = 8.77), while the GPCOG was best for ruling out dementia (negative LR = 0.03). All three instruments were influenced by concomitant depression. Whereas the MMSE was influenced by CALD status, the RUDAS and GPCOG were not. While the GPCOG combines participant and informant data, the RUDAS is a stand-alone measure specifically designed for, and validated in, multicultural populations.
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
Location of study:
Age group:
Number included in study:
151
Type of participants:
older, community-dwelling persons
Research approach:
Quantitative
Type of data:
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
The Folstein Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), the General Practitioner Assessment of Cognition (GPCOG) and the Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale (RUDAS)
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

“There’s really no other option”: Italian Australians’ Experiences of Caring for a Family Member With Dementia

Author/s: Benedetti, Renée Cohen, Lynne Taylor, Myra | Year: 2013 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia

Reference: Benedetti, R., L. Cohen and M. Taylor (2013). ""There's really no other option": Italian Australians' Experiences of Caring for a Family Member With Dementia." Journal of Women & Aging 25(2): 138-164.

Key Words:
dementia, family care, gendered care, access to support
Research aim:
to examine the caregiving experiences of nine Italian Australian caregivers residing in Perth, Western Australia.
Results/Conclusion:
The findings reveal that the Italian community's familism values directly impact on the ability of predominantly female caregivers to access informal and formal dementia support care.
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
Italian
Location of study:
Western Australia
Age group:
Number included in study:
9
Type of participants:
Italian caregivers
Research approach:
Qualitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) Families Dealing with Dementia: An Examination of the Experiences and Perceptions of Multicultural Community Link Workers

Author/s: Boughtwood, Desiree Shanley, Chris Adams, Jon Santalucia, Yvonne Kyriazopoulos, Helena Pond, Dimity Rowland, Jeffery | Year: 2011 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia

Reference: Boughtwood, D., C. Shanley, J. Adams, Y. Santalucia, H. Kyriazopoulos, D. Pond and J. Rowland (2011). "Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) Families Dealing with Dementia: An Examination of the Experiences and Perceptions of Multicultural Community Link Workers." Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology 26(4): 365-377.

Key Words:
dementia, family care giving, infomal care
Research aim:
To undertake an empirical investigation of multicultural workers' perspectives with regard to the cultural traditions informing CALD family care-giving, CALD families'understandings of the term 'carer' and family arrangements regarding care.
Results/Conclusion:
The central finding of this study is that multicultural workers perceive and experience many different influences on decisions made about family care-giving.
Implications:
few CALD families understand the term 'carer' or the implications of the term. This is an extremely important finding, considering the complex emotions and burdens many carers experience along with reports that CALD carers are reluctant to use services
Cultural Group(s):
Italian, Arabic, Spanish-speaking, Chinese
Location of study:
New South Wales (West Sydney)
Age group:
Number included in study:
24
Type of participants:
multicultural care workers
Research approach:
Qualitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes: