Database of Research on Ageing

21 results found

Unpaid carers’ access to and use of primary care services

Author/s: Arksey, Hilary Hirst, Michael | Year: 2005 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Informal Care

Reference: Arksey, H. and M. Hirst (2005). "Unpaid carers' access to and use of primary care services." Primary Health Care Research & Development (Sage Publications, Ltd.) 6(2): 101-116.

Key Words:
informal care, carers, GPs, service access
Research aim:
This paper investigates the difference that caregiving makes to individuals' access to and use of GP and primary care services.
Results/Conclusion:
Men increase their consultation rates with GPs when taking on a caring role. In contrast, women who look after someone in the same household and carry heavy caring responsibilities have relatively less contact with GPs than expected. A five-fold typology is described covering barriers arising from: professional responses to the carers' role; the way services are organized and delivered; language or culturally held beliefs and practices; carer or care recipient characteristics; and unmet information needs.
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
Not specific to CALD
Location of study:
United Kingdom
Age group:
not specific to older people
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
review of
Research approach:
Mixed methods
Type of data:
Mixed
Secondary data sources used:
British Household Panel Survey
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Carers in Australia: assisting frail older people and people with a disability.

Author/s: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare | Year: 2004 | Publication type: Report | Peer reviewed: No | Topic area/s: Carers of CALD Older People, Not Specific to CALD

Reference: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2004) "Carers in Australia: assisting frail older people and people with a disability" AIHW Cat No. AGE 41, Canberra

Key Words:
Family caregivers, Service Provision, Older CALD People, Census Data
Research aim:
The motivation for an exposition on carers in Australia came from an AIHW project that analysed the likely impact of social trends on future numbers of primary carers (Jenkins et al. 2003). Building on this earlier work, the present report uses data from the 1998 Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers to present a picture of informal care in contemporary Australia—who are the primary carers, who do they assist, and what does caring involve? It explores the impact of caring work and patterns of formal service use with informal care.
Results/Conclusion:
This report includes results on: who are primary carers, the demands and consequences of caring work, the changing context of informal care, the impact of social trends on the need for and availability of primary carers and the interplay of informal care and use of formal services. There is no specific chapter on CALD carers or caring for CALD older people but some results are presented by country of birth.
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
Not specific to CALD
Location of study:
Australia
Age group:
N/A
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
N/A
Research approach:
Quantitative
Type of data:
Secondary
Secondary data sources used:
ABS Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers, 1998
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Experiences and Perceptions of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Family Carers of People With Dementia

Author/s: Boughtwood, Desiree Leone Adams, Jon Shanley, Chris Santalucia, Yvonne Boughtwood, Desiree Leone Adams, Jon Shanley, Chris Santalucia, Yvonne Kyriazopoulos, Helena | Year: 2011 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia

Reference: Boughtwood, D. L., J. Adams, C. Shanley, Y. Santalucia and H. Kyriazopoulos (2011). "Experiences and Perceptions of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Family Carers of People With Dementia." American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias 26(4): 290-297.

Key Words:
dementia, family care giving, infomal care
Research aim:
The study examined the experiences and perceptions of these family carers from a CALD background with regard to their caregiving for a person living with dementia (PLWD)
Results/Conclusion:
Analysis revealed that while considerable similarities exist across the experiences and perceptions of carers from all 4 CALD communities, there were nevertheless some important distinctions across the different groups. Arabic-speaking and Chinese-speaking carers did not take an advocacy role in hospitals as described by the Italian-speaking and Spanish-speaking carers. Arabic-speaking and Chinesespeaking carers also reported less conflict with other family members about caregiving decisions than Italian-speaking and Spanish-speaking carers. Gender was not described as impacting care decisions in these latterCALDcommunities to the extent that it was by the Italian-speaking and Spanish-speaking carers participating in the study.Arabic-speaking carers expressedmuch emotion and grief about the condition of the PLWD, worry about the future, and the impact of caring on themselves. However, Arabic-speaking carers were also less concerned about dementia-related behaviors than the other 3 groups.Unlike carers from the other CALD communities, Chinese-speaking carers did not report worrying about the safety of the PLWD.
Implications:
Anglo-Australians were not included, which would enable more direct comparisons between CALD and non-CALD family carers.
Cultural Group(s):
Italian, Arabic, Spanish-speaking, Chinese
Location of study:
New South Wales (West Sydney)
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
Research approach:
Qualitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Diverse strategies for diverse carers: the cultural context of family carers in NSW

Author/s: Cardona, Beatriz Chalmers, Sharon Neilson, Brett | Year: 2005 | Publication type: Report | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Carers who are CALD

Reference: Cardona, B., S. Chalmers and B. Neilson (2005). Diverse strategies for diverse carers: the cultural context of family carers in NSW. Parramatta, NSW, Centre for Cultural Research, University of Western Sydney for the Department of Ageing, Disability and Home Care: 66.

Key Words:
informal care, CALD and non-CALD comparison
Research aim:
Aimed to increase awareness and understanding of the diversity of caring experiences, and the inter relationship of cultural, socio economic and gender issues in shaping the everyday experiences of carers from culturally and linguistically diverse ( CALD ) and Anglo Australian backgrounds
Results/Conclusion:
1) Identification with the role of 'carer' acted as a strategic means to access services, including Centrelink payments. This degree of cultural competence varied between individuals and had a direct impact in their ability to access services and payments. 2) CALD families referred more often to ethno-cultural values to explain their caring commitment while Anglo-Australian carers tended to describe this responsibility as one associated primarily with family roles understood outside a broader cultural frame.
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
CALD (20 birthplace groups included), Australia born
Location of study:
New South Wales (Sydney)
Age group:
40+
Number included in study:
34 CALD, 8 Australia-born
Type of participants:
34 CALD providing informal care, 8 Australia-born carers providing informal care
Research approach:
Qualitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:
Length of residence in Australia did not translate into knowledge of services, with some carers having lived in the country for more than 30 years but still unaware of the services available. Furthermore, the level of English language proficiency did not relate to length of residence with some carers requiring interpreters despite living in Australia for more than 20 years.

Culturally and linguistically diverse carers in Australia: background report

Author/s: Carers Australia | Year: 2013 | Publication type: Report | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: General Care, Carers who are CALD

Reference: Carers Australia (2013). Culturally and linguistically diverse carers in Australia: background report, Carers Australia: 40.

Key Words:
carers, CALD carers, demographic profile
Research aim:
This report provides a profile of CALD carers in Australia, and overview of services, programs. resources and relevant policies and strategies for this group, a list of key issues for identified in the literature and case studies of approaches for culturally and linguistically diverse carers in Australia. The report could be used as a foundation document for further work in developing and prioritising actions to better support culturally and linguistically diverse carers
Results/Conclusion:
Key themes identified by CALD carers were barriers to accessing services and variation of quality and effectiveness of services
Implications:
Programs for CALD carers have been newly initiated and need to be evaluated for their effectiveness
Cultural Group(s):
CALD
Location of study:
Australia (national)
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
Research approach:
Type of data:
Secondary
Secondary data sources used:
ABS Census data, ABS Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers survey
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Community Report: Delivery of ‘Coping with Care-giving’ to Chinese and Spanish-speaking carers of people with dementia living in Australia

Author/s: Dementia Collaborative Research Centre | Year: 2013 | Publication type: Report | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia, Carers who are CALD

Reference: Dementia Collaborative Research Centre (2013). Community Report: Delivery of 'Coping with Care-giving' to Chinese and Spanish-speaking carers of people with dementia living in Australia. Australian Government.

Key Words:
dementia, family care
Research aim:
This report provides information to communities about the results of this trial study of an intervention to support Spanish and Chinese-speaking carers of people with dementia
Results/Conclusion:
The results suggest the intervention had a positive effect on both CALD groups. Specifically, the questionnaire showed Spanish-speakers experienced a reduction in depression, anxiety and stress levels and Chinese-speakers reported less depression.
Implications:
The program holds much promise for addressing some of the needs of Chinese and Spanish-speaking carers and should be explored with other groups
Cultural Group(s):
Spanish, Chinese
Location of study:
New South Wales (West Sydney)
Age group:
Number included in study:
N/A
Type of participants:
bilingual/bicultural family carers of dementia providing care 8 or more hours per week
Research approach:
Pilot study
Type of data:
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

The host-homes program: an innovative model of respite for carers of people with dementia

Author/s: Holm, Sonya Ziguras, Stephen | Year: 2003 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia, Respite

Reference: Holm, S. and S. Ziguras (2003) "The host-homes program: an innovative model of respite for carers of people with dementia" Australasian Journal on Ageing 22(3):141-145

Key Words:
Dementia, respite, service provision, Koori, non-English speaking backgrounds,
Research aim:
To investigate the operation of an innovative community respite program run by the Brotherhood of St Laurence: the Banksia 'host-home' program, which was designed to provide respite for up to six people with dementia in a care-worker's home.
Results/Conclusion:
People using the program were those who experienced barriers utilising centre-based programs for older people for a range of reasons including advanced dementia, hearing difficulties, difficulties in social interaction or confusion. Carers were very appreciative of the service, and care-recipients appeared to enjoy the program immensely, citing caring staff, social contact and activities as things they appreciated most. The host-home program provided an accessible respite option for those unable to use centre based services. It enabled more individually tailored activities, greater socialisation and greater attention from staff than possible in centre-based services.
Implications:
Since the model creates the potential for cost shifting and because of difficulties in supervising staff in their own homes, sidelines and standards appropriate to host-home programs should be established to ensure quality of care and to protect paid staff and service users.
Cultural Group(s):
Not specific to CALD but includes CALD participants
Location of study:
Victoria
Age group:
Not specfic - services providers, family carer givers and care recipients
Number included in study:
4 service providers, 7 care givers, 18 care recipients
Type of participants:
Service providers, care givers and respite recipients
Research approach:
Type of data:
Mixed
Secondary data sources used:
Program data from service provider
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Vitamins for Valentine’s Day. Report of a project exploring ways to support isolated carers of Greek speaking background in promoting their own health and wellbeing

Author/s: Kafanelis, B | Year: 2005 | Publication type: Report | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Carers who are CALD, Informal Care

Reference:

Key Words:
CALD carers, perceptions of CALD carers
Research aim:
The primary purpose of the research was to collect first hand observational qualitative data to assist service providers and policy makers in their efforts to encourage carers to access support services and maintain their own health and wellbeing.
Results/Conclusion:
The project reinforced that cultural beliefs and values had a direct bearing on the way carers perceived and carried out the role of caring and their resilience to 'keep going' no matter how difficult the situation became. It was also found that all carers experienced major health problems, lonliness and isolation were common experiences as were major emotional and psychological challenges, self-care (such as taking time out) seen as 'selfish' by many carers
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
Greek
Location of study:
Victoria
Age group:
Number included in study:
8 case studies
Type of participants:
Greek carers and aged care service providers
Research approach:
Qualitative
Type of data:
Primary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:
Research project and report for Carers Victoria

A Pilot of an Intervention Delivered to Chinese- and Spanish-Speaking Carers of People With Dementia in Australia

Author/s: Leone, Desiree Carragher, Natacha Santalucia, Yvonne Draper, Brian Thompson, Larry W. Shanley, Christopher Mollina, Angelica Chen, Langduo Kyriazopoulos, Helena Thompson, Dolores Gallagher | Year: 2013 | Publication type: Journal article | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: Dementia

Reference:

Key Words:
Research aim:
To explore language and culture-specific support programs for carers of people with dementia - the group intervention for use with Chinese and Spanish speakers in the United States was adapted to the Australian context, and a pilot study was undertaken with these 2 communities.
Results/Conclusion:
A significant decrease in depression, anxiety, and stress was observed among Spanish speakers; a significant decrease in depression and anxiety was present among the Chinese speakers.
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
Location of study:
Age group:
Number included in study:
22
Type of participants:
Chinese and Spanish-speaking carers of people with dementia
Research approach:
Type of data:
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale—Short form (DASS-21)
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:

Final Report: A needs scoping study for African people who are ageing, those with disabilities and their carers

Author/s: Lino, James | Year: 2010 | Publication type: Report | Peer reviewed: | Topic area/s: General Wellbeing, Community Profile

Reference:

Key Words:
African, emerging communities, ageing, future needs
Research aim:
The Needs Scoping Study for African people who are ageing, those with disabilities and their carers (to be referred to as the Study), was developed in response and funded by Home and Community Care, Office for the Ageing, Department for Families and Communities in South Australia to identify emerging needs currently not being met.
Results/Conclusion:
It was found that many of these needs are distinctively different for African people who are ageing due to the particular life experiences given that many arrived in Australia under the Humanitarian Program. Unique challenges for ageing African migrants: Age as a barrier for Africans eligible for HACC services - don't know their real age/don't have age documentation - denied services, pension card etc because of this. Stress due to uncertainty in family reunion Experience of war and the impact on ageing and health
Implications:
Cultural Group(s):
African
Location of study:
South Australia
Age group:
Number included in study:
130
Type of participants:
community members and stakeholders
Research approach:
Mixed methods
Type of data:
Primary and secondary
Secondary data sources used:
Specific scales or analytical techniques used:
Implications/ Recommendations:
Notes:
This report goes with the series produced by Johansson et al (2011) but produced by a different author. Methodology note - noted written questionnaires were not the preferred way of collecting data from this group